Bigger, better, faster, stronger

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Nowadays, it often seems – apart from money – there is only one goal left: getting to the top. But in this insane race it’s sometimes hard to keep up. A lapse of concentration or even being tired is just not part of the plan. You want to be on the top of your game every single day. And if a good night’s sleep and eating healthy isn’t enough anymore to recharge your batteries, there’s still Ritalin.

The medicine was originally created to help kids with difficulty in concentration. In the USA the pills have been popular for quite some time – with students who otherwise wouldn’t be able to handle their workload or workaholics with overly busy schedules. The drug that helps calm down nervous kids has a welcome side-effect for adults: It reduces negligible brain activities and thus helps pooling all concentration by stimulating the brain chemical dopamine (see here). Additionally, Ritalin lures its users with the fact that it isn’t addictive – at least not in a physical way. To which extent the mind gets used to nonstop performing and never having to take a break, well, that’s another story. The reason why voices against the use of Ritalin are being raised increasingly is of ethical nature. If doping in sport is illegal, why should it be legit in everyday life? What about those who aren’t willing to manipulate their brain’s performance – will they just fall by the wayside? In what kind of society do we live in where only the doped manage to keep up?

Disorders like burnout and the growing Ritalin fanbase are among the results of a world whose mantra reads ‘bigger, better, faster, stronger’. Oftentimes, that’s where the much-loved work-life-balance begins to totter.

Nowadays, it often seems – apart from money – there is only one goal left: getting to the top. But in this insane race it’s sometimes hard to keep up. A lapse of concentration or even being tired is just not part of the plan. You want to be on the top of your game every single day. And if a good night’s sleep and eating healthy isn’t enough anymore to recharge your batteries, there’s still Ritalin.

The medicine was originally created to help kids with difficulty in concentration. In the USA the pills have been popular for quite some time – with students who otherwise wouldn’t be able to handle their workload or workaholics with overly busy schedules. The drug that helps calm down nervous kids has a welcome side-effect for adults: It reduces negligible brain activities and thus helps pooling all concentration by stimulating the brain chemical dopamine (see here). Additionally, Ritalin lures its users with the fact that it isn’t addictive – at least not in a physical way. To which extent the mind gets used to nonstop performing and never having to take a break, well, that’s another story. The reason why voices against the use of Ritalin are being raised increasingly is of ethical nature. If doping in sport is illegal, why should it be legit in everyday life? What about those who aren’t willing to manipulate their brain’s performance – will they just fall by the wayside? In what kind of society do we live in where only the doped manage to keep up?

Disorders like burnout and the growing Ritalin fanbase are among the results of a world whose mantra reads ‘bigger, better, faster, stronger’. Oftentimes, that’s where the much-loved work-life-balance begins to totter.

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